Jo Phillips and Joe Whitbread from Jo(e) Social Media Inc. spoke to the junior high students at Bluffton School last Tuesday about using social media in a positive way and avoiding the negatives. Treena Mielke Photo

Bluffton students learn about social media

Social media rules and regulations

Jo Phillips and Joe Whitbread from Jo(e) Social Media Inc. spoke to the junior high students at Bluffton School last Tuesday about using social media in a positive way and avoiding the negatives.

The business associates, who are from Lacombe and won the Red Deer chamber of commerce business of the year award, pointed out social media is a great way to connect with friends, learn new things and create one’s own personal brand.

“You can show people who you are in a really great light,” said Jo Phillips.

Grey areas of social media include showing off, getting feedback and snooping and spying. While showing off talents in a positive way and getting feedback can be okay as can snooping in certain situations, these behaviors can also lead to negative outcomes.

Using social media to fill in time because of boredom and to use it to feel better about oneself is not okay.

“That’s when damaging stuff can happen,’ said Phillips.

Social media provides the opportunity to connect with people, it offers entertainment and is an immediate source of news.

On the other hand, social media cal also cause hurt feels and cause people to make unhealthy choices.

Not receiving ‘likes’ from a post may cause negative feelings.

Rules of social media include asking friends or family before you post something about them or tag them in a photo.

Phillips and Whitbread told the students its okay to tell people including their own parents that they need to get permission from that person before they post pictures of them or tag them in a photo.

Using social media should not be a secret.

“You should be able to give your parents your password,” said Whitbread.

The students were also told a private message isn’t really private.

“Pretend all eyes could be on anything you send or write.”

Students were warned about requesting inappropriate pictures.

“No one is entitled to pictures of you under any circumstances,” said Phillips. “Don’t ask a girl for inappropriate photos. It is a criminal offense.”

Whithead and Phillips encouraged the students to use social media in a positive way.

“Your voice is powerful. Stay positive and remember the number one rule is empathy,” they said.”You are the first generation on social media and it’s starting to spin in a positive way.”