Truncated front and rear overhangs, coupled to a set of 19-inch wheels, provide a taut, athletic look. The base engine makes 246 horsepower. Photo: Jaguar.

Truncated front and rear overhangs, coupled to a set of 19-inch wheels, provide a taut, athletic look. The base engine makes 246 horsepower. Photo: Jaguar.

A deep dive into the 2020 Jaguar E-Pace

A premium compact utility vehicle that hits the sweet spot on price, size and features

Virtually all automakers have figured out that the key to current and future business success is in utility vehicles of varying sizes and descriptions.

That lesson hasn’t been lost on Jaguar, which launched the E-Pace for the 2018 model year. It serves as a junior partner to the mid-size F-Pace wagon that arrived for 2017.

If you’re interested in new or used Jaguars, be sure to visit TodaysDrive.com to find your dream car today!

The E-Pace name sounds like it might refer to an electric vehicle, but it uses good-old-fashioned gasoline propulsion. Jaguar’s I-Pace tall hatchback wagon is Jaguar’s sole electric, at least until the 2021 XJ sedan arrives. The E-Pace rests on a front-wheel-drive platform derived from the Land Rover Evoque (Jaguar and Land Rover are owned by the same company). Like the F-Pace, however, the E-Pace has standard all-wheel-drive.

The F-Pace and E-Pace are unmistakable as kin, right down to their similar-looking front-end shapes that are clearly influenced by other Jaguar fleet members. The common thread also extends to the opposite end, where the fashionably sloping liftgate looks attractive enough, but results in reduced cargo space when compared to other more squared-off designs.

The cabin appears equally inviting, especially the cockpit-style driver’s pod that could have been lifted straight out of the F-Type sports car. The touch screen is nice and big and the large, round ventilation controls will no doubt assist the fumble-fingered.

The E-Pace is more than 30 centimetres shorter and nearly nine centimetres narrower than the F-Pace, and is more than 20 centimetres shorter between the front and rear wheels. But the real surprise is that the E-pace actually outweighs the bigger Jag by 34 kilograms, which goes to show that compactness doesn’t necessarily result in a corresponding reduction in heft.

Fortunately, the E-Pace is up to the task of quickly and efficiently hauling passengers and cargo, using a turbocharged 2.0-litre four-cylinder engine that’s rated at a respectable 246 horsepower and 269 pound-feet of torque. It’s standard in the P250 models.

For significantly more oomph, the E-Pace P300 R-Dynamic trims come with a turbo 2.0 that puts 296 horsepower and 295 pound-feet of torque.

A nine-speed automatic is the sole transmission choice.

The all-wheel-drive hardware depends on the engine, starting with a permanently engaged setup for the P250 models. The P300 R-Dynamic’s “Active Driveline” powers only the front wheels in normal driving conditions. When traction loss is detected, the system can direct nearly all of the available torque to the rear wheels and to a specific rear wheel, if necessary.

Active Driveline’s standard torque-vectoring system “uses the brakes to (balance) the distribution of engine torque between all four wheels during cornering.” According to the company, this reduces the vehicle’s natural tendency to travel in a straight line even when the steering wheel is turned (called understeer).

Common to all E-Pace models is a low-speed cruise-control system that regulates the vehicle’s speed between two km/h and 30 km/h. Interestingly, active-safety technology such as blind-spot warning and adaptive cruise control are not standard, although lane-keeping assist is.

E-Pace pricing starts at $51,700, including destination charges. For that pile of cash, you get a reasonable level of standard content, but to move closer to the luxury zone you’ll need to select the R-Dynamic or Checkered Flag versions for leather seat coverings, panoramic roof, navigation, head-up info display and 19-inch wheels (18s are standard).

The performance-laden P300 R-Dynamic adds about $5,700 to the base price, but you also get larger brakes, 20-inch wheels plus a bit more comfort content.

Whatever the choice, the E-pace is an enticing little cat, with the looks, luxury and power that fits with the Jaguar name and reputation. And it’s a utility vehicle.

What you should know: 2020 Jaguar E-Pace

Type: Four-door, all-wheel-drive compact utility vehicle

Engine (h.p.): 2.0-litre DOHC I-4, turbocharged (246/296)

Transmission: Nine-speed automatic

Market position: The E-Pace is one of a growing legion of smaller premium utility vehicles. many of which resemble their larger stable mates. In some cases, these models have replaced traditional sedans in their respective lineups.

Points: Nicely balanced design presses all the right “want-it-now” buttons.

• Both base and higher-output versions of the turbo-2.0 engine should prove more than acceptable in the power department. • Jaguar’s aversion to offering manual transmissions is typical of most luxury brands these days. • Surprisingly heavy when compared with similarly sized wagons.

Active safety: Blind-spot warning with cross-traffic alert (opt.); active cruise control (opt.); emergency braking (std.); lane-keeping assist (std.)

L/100 km (city/hwy) 11.0/8.4 (base 2.0); Base price (incl. destination) $51,700

BY COMPARISON

Lincoln Corsair AWD

Base price: $46,800

MKC replacement offers two turbo I-4 engines plus standard active-safety tech.

BMW X1 xDrive 28i

Base price: $45,100

Second-generation model uses the Mini Countryman platform. Can get pricey.

Lexus NX 300 AWD

Base price: $46,400

Less than subtle styling breaks from the pack. AWD Hybrid version available.

-written by Malcom Gunn, Managing Partner at Wheelbase Media

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Instagram

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

Alberta premier Jason Kenney declared a public health state of emergency Tuesday and sweeping new measures as COVID-19 cases in the province continue to rise. (photo by Chris Schwarz/Government of Alberta)
Kenney declares state of public health emergency as COVID-19 cases rise

High schools shift to online learning, businesses face new restrictions

The tree decorated in red decorations is called the Buffalo Plaid Cottage Tree. Papple says this tree has more of a "taditional, cottage-y feel." (Photo Submitted)
Sylvan Lake resident auctioning decorated Christmas trees to help local charities

Shauntel Papple is auctioning two fully decorated trees to benefit AACS and Youth Unlimited

(Photo submitted)
Bentley couple celebrates 60th anniversary

They still laugh, hold hands, play crib and fish says daughter

Alberta’s chief medical officer of health, Dr. Deena Hinshaw, announced the province surpasses one million COVID-19 tests Friday. (Photo by Chris Schwarz/Government of Alberta)
COVID-19: Central zone active cases up by 100 in last 24 hours

Most central Alberta communities under province’s enhanced measures list

.
Alberta confirmed more than 1,500 COVID-19 cases Sunday

Central zone active cases slightly up

Kyle Charles poses for a photo in Edmonton on Friday, Nov. 20, 2020. Marvel Entertainment, the biggest comic book publisher in the world, hired the 34-year-old First Nations illustrator as one of the artists involved in Marvel Voice: Indigenous Voices #1 in August. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jason Franson
VIDEO: Indigenous illustrator of new Marvel comic hopes Aboriginal women feel inspired

Kyle Charles says Indigenous women around the world have reached out

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau speak to the media about the COVID-19 virus outside Rideau Cottage in Ottawa, Friday, Nov. 20, 2020. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Adrian Wyld
Canada’s inability to manufacture vaccines in-house will delay distribution: Trudeau

First doses of COVID-19 vaccine expected in first few months of 2021, prime minister says

This undated photo issued by the University of Oxford shows of vial of coronavirus vaccine developed by AstraZeneca and Oxford University, in Oxford, England. Pharmaceutical company AstraZeneca said Monday Nov. 23, 2020, that late-stage trials showed its coronavirus vaccine was up to 90% effective, giving public health officials hope they may soon have access to a vaccine that is cheaper and easier to distribute than some of its rivals. (University of Oxford/John Cairns via AP)
VIDEO: How do the leading COVID vaccines differ? And what does that mean for Canada?

All three of the drug companies are incorporating novel techniques in developing their vaccines

Ilaria Rubino is shown in this undated handout image at University of Alberta. Alberta researcher Rubino has developed technology allowing mostly salt to kill pathogens in COVID-19 droplets as they land on a mask. THE CANADIAN PRESS/HO-University of Alberta
Alberta researcher gets award for COVID-19 mask innovation

The salt-coated mask is expected to be available commercially next year after regulatory approval.

Russ and Luanne Carl are sharing about their experiences of fighting COVID-19 this past summer. (Photo submitted)
Stettler couple opens up about COVID-19 battle

Luanne and Russ Carl urge others to bolster personal safety measures amidst ongoing pandemic

This 2019 photo provided by The ALS Association shows Pat Quinn. Quinn, a co-founder of the viral ice bucket challenge, died Sunday, Nov. 22, 2020, at the age of 37. (Scott Kauffman/The ALS Association via AP)
Co-founder of viral ALS Ice Bucket Challenge dies at 37

Pat Quinn was diagnosed with Lou Gehrig’s disease, also known as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, in 2013

Minister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada David Lametti speaks with the media following party caucus in Ottawa, Tuesday, January 28, 2020. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Adrian Wyld
Exclusion of mental health as grounds for assisted death is likely temporary: Lametti

Senators also suggested the exclusion renders the bill unconstitutional

Claudio Mastronardi, Toronto branch manager at Carmichael Engineering, is photographed at the company’s offices in Mississauga, Ont., Thursday, Nov. 19, 2020. As indoor air quality becomes a major concern in places of business, HVAC companies are struggling to keep up with demand for high quality filtration systems. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Chris Young
Business is booming for HVAC companies as commercial buildings see pandemic upgrades

‘The demand right now is very high. People are putting their health and safety ahead of cost’

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau speak to the media about the COVID-19 virus outside Rideau Cottage in Ottawa, Friday, Nov. 20, 2020. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Adrian Wyld
Long-awaited federal rent subsidy program for businesses hurt by COVID-19 opens today

The new program will cover up to 65 per cent of rent or commercial mortgage interest

Most Read