In recognition of Remembrance Day 2008, the Rimbey Review contacted a number of area residents last week for their answers to the question: Why do you wear a poppy? Following are their responses:

“As Canadians we often take for granted our way of life, our freedom to participate in cultural and political events and our right to live under a government of our choice. The Canadians who went off to war in distant lands went in the belief that such rights and freedoms were being threatened.

“As Canadians we often take for granted our way of life, our freedom to participate in cultural and political events and our right to live under a government of our choice. The Canadians who went off to war in distant lands went in the belief that such rights and freedoms were being threatened. It is the poppy that helps me remember that many brave men and women fought for the freedom we have today. The poppy to me is a symbol of remembrance and celebration of the lives we live today.”

– Don Wielinga,

Principal Rimbey

Elementary School

“The poppy is first to remember those that gave up their lives for our freedom. Wearing the poppy is special to me as I always remember back when I was a Boy Scout. We sold poppies on Saturday and on Remembrance Day we got to carry the flags and march with the Legion members in uniform down Main Street. I always looked up to them and still do.

– Dale Barr,

Mayor of Rimbey

“I wear a poppy as a sign of respect for those who have made sacrifices during times of war to preserve our way of life. As I was growing up, the soldiers I refer to were primarily from World War II, but now I wear a poppy also in respect for those who have fought in modern conflicts, including Afghanistan.

– Tim Lekas,

Principal Rimbey

Jr/Sr High School

John McCrae was so deeply moved by what he saw in northern France he wrote the poem ‘In Flanders Field” wherein the poppy became the popular symbol for the soldiers who died in battle. Poet Moria Michael later wrote and promised to wear a poppy “in honour of our dead”. I wear the poppy each November in memory and honour of my friends and comrades who gave their lives at such a young age in the service of their country. May God give us the wisdom, the intelligence, and the courage to make it a reality one day. “Never Again”.

– Joe Anglin,

Chairman Lavesta Area Group

“I feel that wearing a poppy shows respect and gratitude to the thousands of men and women who gave their lives and/or health believing that they were helping to make the world a better place to live.”

Neville Roper,

Second World War Veteran

“Wearing the poppy symbolizes my eternal gratitude for those who have served and sacrificed so much for our great country.”

– Blaine Calkins,

M.P. Wetaskiwin

“To me, Remembrance Day is a very special day; one that has been especially designated so that we may publicly honour those who fought for the freedoms we enjoy today. I wear a poppy as a tribute to all those brave men and women and, also as a special thank you to two veterans who have touched my life – my mother, Kathryn Albers and my father-in-law, the late Roy Dickau.

– Joan Dickau,

Mayor of Bentley

“Lest We Forget! On behalf of the Government of Alberta, I salute all our Veterans and would like to say thank you to those who sacrificed so much for our freedom.”

– Ray Prins,

M.L.A. Lacombe-Ponoka

Constituency

“I wear a poppy as an expression of gratitude towards all the men an women who served in the World Wars. I also want to recognize those who have been killed or are currently serving in more recent conflict around the world.”

– Nolan Krauss,

Principal Bluffton School

“I wear a poppy because it’s the very least I can do to remember all the Canadian soldiers and soldiers from all over the world that have lost their lives in the horror of war. I had two uncles in the First World War, another uncle was killed in the Second World War, my husband died from the results of the Second World War, my fiancé who I was engaged to at the beginning of the war was killed on the beaches and yes, I remember and I wear a poppy to remember them and think about them.”

– Edna Pratt,

Second World War Veteran