Stephan James shares his view on the ‘Homecoming’ fork scene as he returns for S2

Stephan James shares his view on the ‘Homecoming’ fork scene as he returns for S2

Stephan James shares his view on the ‘Homecoming’ fork scene as he returns for S2

TORONTO — As he rises in the ranks of Hollywood, Toronto actor Stephan James has found himself fielding not only more scripts, but also many questions about a certain eating instrument.

“The concierge in my apartment wants to know about the fork,” James said with a laugh in a recent interview.

The Golden Globe-nominated star of Amazon Prime Video’s psychological thriller “Homecoming” was referring to a crucial and cryptic scene involving a fork and his amnesia-stricken character Walter Cruz in a diner in the season 1 finale.

The cutlery conundrum was a subtle moment but sparked many think pieces and fan queries.

Did Walter moving the fork slightly on the table indicate he remembered his time with social worker Heidi (Julia Roberts) in the Homecoming Initiative, a top-secret transitional support centre for troops returning to civilian life? Or was it a meaningless gesture?

James can only offer his own personal theory as the mystery-filled show enters its second season Friday.

“I don’t think that Walter really recognized Heidi in that moment, but perhaps he recognized her spirit. So I’ll leave it at that,” James said.

But did he at least get to keep the fork as a piece of memorabilia from the set?

“I’ve been looking for the fork for over a year now,” the 26-year-old said.

Based on a podcast by series creators Eli Horowitz and Micah Bloomberg, “Homecoming” is a noir story of corporate greed colliding with military interests.

In season 1, Walter and other former soldiers are put through a shady Geist Group wellness company program seemingly meant to help them move on — and forget — their battlefield trauma.

Amazon has asked that season 2 spoilers be kept under wraps until the launch, but what can be said is that Walter returns and is trying to rebuild his life.

Also returning is Hong Chau as Geist employee Audrey Temple.

New cast members include Janelle Monae, Chris Cooper, and Joan Cusack.

Not returning is Sam Esmail, who directed the first season. Instead, the new batch of episodes are helmed by Kyle Patrick Alvarez.

Cast members absent this season include Roberts, who is also an executive producer on the show. She only signed on to act for season 1 but did surprise the cast during filming of season 2.

“Janelle and I were in the middle of a scene and she pops around the corner in this round of applause, in a very Julia-esque way, and just took all the attention,” James said with a laugh.

“But she’s incredible. She has a great light, a great energy, a great spirit. She texted me, I want to say yesterday or two days ago, just with an old photo of us. So we check up on each other regularly.”

James also originally only signed on for the first season and was “elated” to be invited back to “get into the humanity and the psychology” of Walter, a character that earned him a Golden Globe nomination for best actor last year.

“I felt for me, there was a lot of unfinished business as far as Walter was concerned, and so it was really a joy for me to come back and tie up the loose ends,” he said.

James’ other well-known film projects ”If Beale Street Could Talk,” “Selma” and “21 Bridges.”

He’s also starring in the new Quibi series #FreeRayshawn, about a man who turns to social media to try to prove his innocence during a standoff with New Orleans police.

“I think it’s really telling, this element of social media that people of colour have often used almost in a cry for help, and in a way to try and be protected and to rally the troops, if you will,” James said.

“I don’t know if those videos always work in our favour or are always able to help us.”

James grew up in the Toronto suburb of Scarborough and is back in city after living in Los Angeles for a couple of years. He says he’s ”trying to stay inside, stay creative” during the COVID-19 pandemic.

He and his brother, fellow actor Shamier Anderson, have been giving back to the city’s arts community in recent years through their B.L.A.C.K. initiative.

The not-for-profit, which is an acronym for Building A Legacy In Acting Cinema and Knowledge, usually holds a B.L.A.C.K. Ball gala every year during the Toronto International Film Festival.

James said it doesn’t look like the gala will happen this year due to the pandemic, but they’re now in discussions for a possible online version of B.L.A.C.K.’s monologue slam competition.

The initiative sees 10 schools from Scarborough competing for prizes including Toronto Raptors tickets, headshots and acting advice.

“Things that me and my brother looked for while we were coming up in the industry in Toronto,” James said.

“Being able to give these young students a head start where that’s concerned has been something that’s been really, really rewarding.”

This report by The Canadian Press was first published May 20, 2020.

Victoria Ahearn, The Canadian Press

Entertainment

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

skip2
Rimbey Christian School students experience the joy of giving

Grades three and four students raised $2,000 for Somalian children

Alberta’s chief medical officer of health, Dr. Deena Hinshaw, confirmed eight additional virus-deaths Monday afternoon including one in central zone. (Photo by Chris Schwarz/Government of Alberta)
New record: Red Deer at 236 active COVID cases

One more death in central zone reported

Janelle Robinson owns and operates Spirit’s Respite Ranch near Stettler. The Ranch, just north of Stettler, is an animal therapy ranch that helps those with special needs and conditions ranging from PTSD to anxiety. Mark Weber/Stettler Independent
Spirit’s Respite Ranch near Stettler provides support through animal interaction

‘I also come from a family of doers - if something that is needed isn’t there, you just figure it out’

Sylvan Lake RCMP Detachment. Photo Courtesy of Google Maps
Sylvan Lake RCMP address three key areas of resident concern

RCMP were notified of these main areas of concern through an online Town Hall

Alberta had 1,571 active COVID-19 cases on Tuesday. THE CANADIAN PRESS
Alberta’s central zone now has 1,101 active COVID-19 cases

Provincial death toll has risen by nine

Idyllic winter scenes are part of the atmosphere of the holiday season, and are depicted in many seasonal movies. How much do you know about holiday movies? Put your knowledge to the test. (Pixabay.com)
QUIZ: Test your knowledge of holiday movies and television specials

The festive season is a time for relaxing and enjoying some seasonal favourites

Deputy Prime Minister and Minister of Finance Chrystia Freeland listens to a question from a reporter on the phone during a news conference in Ottawa, Monday, Nov. 30, 2020. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Adrian Wyld
Spending too little worse than spending too much, Freeland says as Canada’s deficit tops $381B

‘The risk of providing too little support now outweighs that of providing too much’

Wetaskiwin Composite High School. Shaela Dansereau/ Pipestone Flyer.
Wetaskiwin Regional Public Schools prepare for transition back to online learning

Grades 7-12 will are mandated to transfer to online learning starting Nov. 30, 2020.

Lawyer Devon Page, Ecojustice Canada’s executive director, pauses during a news conference in Vancouver on Wed., Sept. 26, 2012. The environmental law group has lost its bid to pause Alberta’s inquiry into where critics of its oil and gas industry get their funding. Ecojustice sought an injunction this summer to suspend the inquiry, headed by forensic accountant Steve Allan, until there is a decision on whether it’s legal. nbsp;THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck
Judge tosses application to pause Alberta inquiry into funding of oil and gas foes

Ecojustice sought an injunction in the summer to suspend the inquiry

Janelle Robinson owns and operates Spirit’s Respite Ranch near Stettler. The Ranch, just north of Stettler, is an animal therapy ranch that helps those with special needs and conditions ranging from PTSD to anxiety. Mark Weber/Stettler Independent
Spirit’s Respite Ranch near Stettler provides support through animal interaction

‘I also come from a family of doers - if something that is needed isn’t there, you just figure it out’

A pedestrian makes their way through the snow in downtown Ottawa on Wednesday, Nov. 25, 2020. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Sean Kilpatrick
Wild winter, drastic swings in store for Canada this year: Weather Network

In British Columbia and the Prairies, forecasters are calling for above-average snowfall levels

NDP Leader John Horgan, left, speaks as local candidate Ravi Kahlon listens during a campaign stop at Kahlon’s home in North Delta, B.C., on April 18, 2017. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck
A B.C. Ambulance Service paramedic wearing a face mask to curb the spread of COVID-19 moves a stretcher outside an ambulance at Royal Columbia Hospital, in New Westminster, B.C., on Sunday, November 29, 2020. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck
Top doctor urges Canadians to limit gatherings as ‘deeply concerning’ outbreaks continue

Canada’s active cases currently stand at 63,835, compared to 53,907 a week prior

A Canadian Pacific freight train travels around Morant’s Curve near Lake Louise, Alta., on Monday, Dec. 1, 2014. A study looking at 646 wildlife deaths along the railway tracks in Banff and Yoho national parks in Alberta and British Columbia has found that train speed is one of the biggest factors. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Frank Gunn
Study finds train speed a top factor in wildlife deaths in Banff, Yoho national parks

Research concludes effective mitigation could address train speed and ability of wildlife to see trains

Most Read