COVID-19 is still alive and well.

COVID-19 is still alive and well.

  • Jun. 8, 2020 6:20 p.m.

COVID-19 is still alive and well.

As of yet there is no vaccine available for this invisible enemy that has imprisoned us with serious illness and even death threats for the last several weeks.

But, slowly, ever so slowly people are beginning to emerge from their self-imposed cocoons, like butterflies finally set free.

The feeling of freedom, though somewhat illusive, is so lovely. It is hard to remember the rules about COVID.

It is, after all, invisible.

I went for coffee with a girlfriend the other day. I mean we really went for coffee, just like in the old days before COVID.

We sat down inside the coffee shop and drank our coffee.

Of course, it wasn’t quite like the old days. Many of the booths and tables were cordoned off, but still it felt so good and right and normal as we sat there together and the sun streamed in through the window, warming us on the inside and the outside.

Our talk was sprinkled with observations, questions and concerns about COVID-19, but as we sipped our coffee and just soaked in the absolute delight of hanging out while the sun played with a few wispy white clouds outside in a clear, blue sky, it just felt good.”

“Is your garden up?” my friend asked.

“No,” I replied. “Why? Is yours?”

“It is,” she said, with only a slight hint of pride.

Immediately I forgot all about COVID and all I could think of was, “why is her garden up already?”

I stifled the urge to immediately run home and check out my miniature rows of lettuce, radish, peas and carrots and some other seeds I had tossed in to see if anything had sprung up in the last 20 minutes.

I practiced self control, however and did not immediately bolt out of the coffee shop. I did check it out when I got home, however.

Nothing!

Oh well, it will come up soon enough, I think to myself, throwing in a little faith, hope and love into the thought process for good measure.

As much as planning a garden and sprinkling in a little faith, hope and love into the seed packets, is important, I am once again reminded of the importance of doing the same thing when it comes to COVID-19.

It is true the economy suffered and people have lost their jobs, but, slowly things are turning around and as trite as it sounds, perhaps the old saying, if one door closes, another one opens, still remains a positive adage to remember.

It is true that many people have lost precious loved ones due to this pandemic, but many people have recovered, and, thanks to the positive effects of social distancing, we are all becoming a little safer day by day.

And, once again, the season of hope and promise has returned, as perennial as the grass.

And for that I am grateful.

And now I need to go check on my garden one more time just in case!

Cheers!

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