Bluffton students participate in session from space

The most amazing thing about talking to astronaut Chris Hadfield for Bluffton Grade 8 student Megan Theveau was watching him move about

Bluffton students were among 500 students who travelled to the Telus World of Science April 9 to participate in a live question and answer session from space with astronaut Chris Hadfield.

Bluffton students were among 500 students who travelled to the Telus World of Science April 9 to participate in a live question and answer session from space with astronaut Chris Hadfield.

The most amazing thing about talking to astronaut Chris Hadfield for Bluffton Grade 8 student Megan Theveau was watching him move about in the International Space Station while they were chatting.

“He was just basically floating around,” she said.

The 13-year-old was one of 41 students from Bluffton who travelled to the Telus World of Science April 9 to participate in a live question and answer session from space with Hadfield.

“I asked him what the stars look like in space and he said they were a lot brighter and clearer there,” she said.

Ashley Matson, a 15-year-old Grade 9 student, found the experience of talking to him “pretty cool.”

Rebecca Lohmann, 14, who is also in Grade 9, asked the astronaut what he missed the most while up in space.

“He told me people in general and hot showers,” she said.

Phillip Hambly, Bluffton junior high math and science teacher, who went with his classes to the science centre, said they are still talking about the experience of attending the session with Hadfield.

“To say it piqued their curiosity is putting it mildly,” he said.

During the session, Hadfield gave the Bluffton students who were among 500 Edmonton-area students, a snapshot preview of life in space. He also talked about how his experiences as an engineer and military pilot led him to become Canada’s first commander of the International Space Station.

Hadfield, who blasted off from Kazakhstan in December, answered questions for 20 minutes, sometimes letting his microphone float, as he demonstrated various activities.

He is expected to return to Earth May 13.

Prior to Hadfield’s appearance, Mathieu Landry, senior operations engineer for the Canadian Space Agency, gave an overview of Hadfield’s mission. He noted the commander spends most of his time working on more than 100 science experiments.