Earl Giebelhaus holds up a drawing of a beautification project planned by the Mason Lodge No. 95. The walkway and mini park is to be located near the soccer fields and is a three-to-four year project.

Earl Giebelhaus holds up a drawing of a beautification project planned by the Mason Lodge No. 95. The walkway and mini park is to be located near the soccer fields and is a three-to-four year project.

Council approves Masons’ beautification project

A beautification project, including a park and walkway, proposed by the Masons in Rimbey, has been given the green light

A beautification project, including a park and walkway, proposed by the Masons in Rimbey, has been given the green light by town council and work on the project should begin this spring.

At its March 26 meeting, council approved a proposal by the Kitchener Lodge No. 95 to develop a mini park, a walkway, trees, a bridge and berms west of the soccer fields located south of town.

Council, which had met with Mason representatives Earl Giebelhaus and Allan Tarleton at a committee of the whole meeting earlier, voted unanimously in favor of the project.

“I think it’s a great idea as it will add to the overall beautification of the community and it will provide a place to sit and enjoy the surrounding area while you are on the walking trails,” said Coun. Gayle Rondeel.

Council also agreed to provide crushed concrete from the town as well as the use of the town skid steer loader during construction.

The park and walkway is to be a three- to four-year project but the Masons would like to have the base of the trail done this year.

Earl Giebelhaus said $1,500 has been earmarked for the project and more money will be raised through ladies’ night, a fundraiser to be held April 26.

He said the memorial park is to be built to recognize that the Kitchener Lodge has been present in the community for 96 years and will celebrate its centennial in four years.

“I’m excited about it. It will be a good thing, a way to recognize the people in the past who contributed to the Masonic Lodge.”

The Masonic Fraternity has been in existence for hundreds of years and has remained true to its tradition of helping the less fortunate. Causes range from operating children’s hospitals, providing treatment for childhood language disorders, treating eye diseases, funding medical research, contributing to local community service and providing care to Masons and their families at Masonic Homes.

The four million Masons worldwide continue to help men and women face the problems of the 21st century by encouraging unity and hope for the future.