Andre De Grasse looks on after competing in the senior men’s 100 metre dash at the Canadian Track and Field Championships in Ottawa on Friday, July 6, 2018. (TTHE CANADIAN PRESS/Justin Tang)

Hamstring injury ends season for Andre De Grasse

Sprinter suffered injury while competing last weekend at Canadian track and field championships

Canadian sprinter Andre De Grasse will not race again this season after suffering a right hamstring strain.

De Grasse suffered the injury while competing in the 200 metre semifinal Saturday at the Canadian track and field championships, causing him to slow to a walk over the final 30 metres of the race.

READ MORE: Three-time Olympic medallist Andre De Grasse pulls up injured in 200 semifinal

According to a statement from Brian Levine, who is De Grasse’s brand manager with Toronto-based Envision Sports & Entertainment, the sprinter had an MRI on Sunday that revealed a grade 1 strain in his right hamstring.

While the injury is not considered serious, De Grasse’s camp felt it best to shut the sprinter down for the remainder of a quiet season with no major championships. The track-and-field schedule gets far busier over the next three years with world championships in 2019 and 2021 and the 2020 Olympics in Tokyo.

“I never want to hit the track and put out a performance that is less than my best, but if it has to happen, this is the year for it to happen,” De Grasse said in the statement.

The three-time Olympic medallist had a late start to the season after suffering a more serious right hamstring strain while training for the 2017 world championships in London.

He looked solid on his road to recovery at the Canadian championships, placing third in Friday’s night 100 metres in 10.20 seconds. He was considered a threat to reach the podium in the 200 before his latest setback.

The injury means De Grasse will not be able to compete at the upcoming North American, Central American and Caribbean championships in Toronto.

“I was looking forward to representing Canada at ‘Track & Field in the 6ix’ in front of the hometown crowd at the NACAC championships, but instead I will have to be there cheering for my Canadian teammates and contributing to the excitement off the track,” he said.

It’s been a happier year off the track for De Grasse, who became a dad last month when his girlfriend gave birth to a baby girl.

“I believe the issues I’ve faced these past 12 months have made me hungrier,” he said. ”I will heal quickly from this injury. I will go be with my daughter and focus on being a dad for the next few weeks as I heal, and I will plan to come back stronger than ever.”

The Canadian Press

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter

Just Posted

Rimbey students help out

‘Tis the season

Hawk Tail Brewery ready to open doors

New Rimbey business to begin operation

Peace officer keeps busy

Trenholm’s duties include ensuring municipal bylaws and provincial legislation is adhered to

Rimbey RCMP get called to domestic dispute

Rocky Mountain House and Ponoka RCMP assist

WATCH: CP Holiday Train rolls into Lacombe

Kelly Prescott performed for hundreds of Central Albertans

Condominium market still ‘a lot better’ than normal in Vancouver suburbs

The Fraser Valley, east of Metro Vancouver, has long been considered a more affordable haven for first-time homebuyers.

Wolf Creek Public Schools announces new communications coordinator

Vince Burke previously worked for STAR Catholic Schools

Retired B.C. teacher a YouTube Sudoku sensation

A retired Kelowna teacher has amassed quite the following online by teaching the art of solving a Sudoku puzzle.

UN chief returns as climate talks teeter closer to collapse

Predictions from international climate expert, warn that global warming is set to do irreversible environmental damage.

Trump’s willingness to intervene in Meng detention roils Canada’s justification

The International Crisis Group said Tuesday, Dec. 11 it’s aware of reports that its North East Asia senior adviser Michael Kovrig has been detained.

Scientist awarded $100K for work on Arctic contaminants that led to ban

Derek Muir has received the $100,000 Weston Family Prize for his research that showed those carcinogens were able to move into the Arctic.

Manhunt continues for France shooter

Suspected gunman named, had long police record

‘Jurassic Park,’ ‘Shining’ added to National Film Registry

“These cinematic treasures must be protected because they document our history, culture, hopes and dreams.”

Most Read