‘Looking for answers:’ More people turning to stars, planets during pandemic

‘Looking for answers:’ More people turning to stars, planets during pandemic

Many people are out of work and struggling to figure out what to do next, Young says

Samantha Chin is busier than usual.

The Toronto-based astrologer has seen a surge in the number of people turning to the planets and stars to find direction in their lives during the global COVID-19 pandemic.

“I normally teach one class a week,” says Chin, who also goes by the name Lady Samantha.

“I had to increase that to three classes a week, because there was so much demand for new students. And my personal practice — I’ve been booking consistently a month in advance because I’m fully booked.”

Chin, who also owns a crystals store, says some items have been consistently sold out. And that’s never happened before.

Donna Young, an astrologer in Alberta, says the number of her clients in Canada and the United States has spiked by about 50 per cent during the pandemic, and some astrology courses she teachesonline have been sold out for the first time ever.

As the director and Canadian representative for the Organization for Professional Astrology, the 59-year-old says colleagues around the world are also seeing a significant increase in clients.

“I have a colleague in Turkey whose student body went from 100 to 900 during the pandemic.”

Many people are out of work and struggling to figure out what to do next, Young says.

And “our lack of emotional resources, our financial insecurity, other quirks … become apparent if we’re alone in contemplation,” she adds.

“It’s not so much about manoeuvring the pandemic as it is about people wanting to really understand their place in the world.”

Young and Chin both say careers and relationships are typically the biggest questions for people, and they still are during the pandemic.

“It’s just that more people are concerned about it. More people are looking for answers,”said Young.

Stephanie Ho, who works in finance in Toronto, decided to enrol in more astrology courses during the pandemic.

She broke up with her boyfriend a year ago and was feeling confused. With more time on her hands during the pandemic, the 35-year-old turned to astrology, which she says has taught her more about herself.

“I’m much more complicated than what my sun sign tells me I am,” says Ho. “I’ve learned a lot about my strengths, my weaknesses, my goals in life, my potential in my career, my personality traits.”

Ho says she has also learned a lot about how moments in her childhood have shaped her. And for the first time, she says she has been having open conversations with her friends and family about it.

“Samantha was able to unpack my childhood wounds in seven minutes in one class,” she says.

Young says the growing interest in astrology has been prominent among young people looking for direction.

“Because they’re not as skeptical as the generations before them. Once upon a time, you would have been hard pressed to find somebody who even wanted to admit that they believed in astrology.”

Young, who has been practising astrology for 20 years, says the transit system of planets and stars have shaped her life significantly.

In 2017, astrologers from around the world, including herself, saw that 2020 was going to be a difficult year, she says.

The prediction was one reason why she moved from Calgary to Sylvan Lake, a small community south of Edmonton, where she grows her own vegetables and raises chickens.

She says she didn’t want to be dependent on the country’s food supply during the pandemic.

Asked to predict when the pandemic will end, Young says it won’t be soon.

“We’re not out of the woods. We’ve still got another year, or 18 months, maybe longer,” Young says.

“We’re not going to recover from this for some time … you don’t need to be an astrologer to figure that out.”

–––

This story was produced with the financial assistance of the Facebook and Canadian Press News Fellowship.

Fakiha Baig, The Canadian Press

Stargazing

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

Alberta has 3,651 active cases of COVID-19.  (File photo)
750 new COVID-19 cases identified in Alberta Sunday

Central zone currently has 1,182 active cases of the virus

The Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine deliveres to Canada are being delayed because of complications at their European distribution facility. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Nathan Denette
Delays of Pfizer vaccine delivery to impact Alberta’s vaccination plans

Alberta has administered 74,000 doses of the COVID-19 vaccine so far

blessing
Bentley Blessing Pantry continues to faithfully serve the community

‘We just wanted to make everyone aware that we are still here to serve you throughout this coming year.’

A scene from “Canada and the Gulf War: In their own words,” a video by The Memory Project, a program of Historica Canada, is shown in this undated illustration. THE CANADIAN PRESS/HO - Historica Canada
New video marks Canada’s contributions to first Gulf War on 30th anniversary

Veterans Affairs Canada says around 4,500 Canadian military personnel served during the war

Lacombe is looking at its options for reclaiming sewage lagoons that are no longer needed. Vesta Energy Ltd. has signed a deal to use three lagoons to store water for fracking.
Map from City of Lacombe
Energy company to use former Lacombe sewage lagoons to store water for fracking

Vesta Energy Ltd. will pay Lacombe more than $100,000 a year in 20-year deal

Alberta Chief Medical Officer of Health Dr. Deena Hinshaw said on Monday that11 more people had died from COVID-19, bringing the province’s death toll to 1,447. (Photography by Chris Schwarz/Government of Alberta)
Eleven more Albertans die from COVID-19

There were 739 people in hospital, 120 in ICU on Monday

World Juniors’ referee Mike Langin makes a called during the Canada vs. Slovakia at the 2021 World Junior Championship at Rogers Place in Edmonton, Dec. 27, 2020. (Photo by Matthew Murnaghan/Hockey Canada)
Former Sylvan Lake man lives his dream at World Junior Championships

Mike Langin was one the 25 Canadian officials who worked during the tournament

Indigenous people gather for a ceremony for Cindy Gladue held at the courthouse in Edmonton, Alta, on Wednesday, January 13, 2021. Bradley Barton, a 52-year-old long-haul truck driver from Ontario on trial for manslaughter, is accused of killing Gladue. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jason Franson
People stand in support of mother as new trial gets underway in death of Cindy Gladue

Bradley Barton, a long-haul truck driver from Ontario, will now be tried for manslaughter in the 2011 death

(Photo submitted)
RCMP say ice climber seriously injured after reportedly falling 12 metres near Abraham Lake

Police say man’s injuries were serious but not life-threatening

U.S. military units march in front of the Capitol, Monday, Jan. 18, 2021 in Washington, as they rehearse for President-elect Joe Biden’s inauguration ceremony, which will be held at the Capitol on Wednesday. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)
Biden aims for unifying speech at daunting moment for U.S.

President Donald Trump won’t be there to hear it

Facebook/ The Open Door 24/7 Integrated Response Hub- Wetaskiwin.
Wetaskiwin residents show support for 24/7 Integrated Response Hub

Wetaskiwin residents and City Council members showed support for Hub with positive signs.

Conservative Leader Erin O’Toole holds a press conference on Parliament Hill, in Ottawa on December 10, 2020. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Sean Kilpatrick
No place for ‘far right’ in Conservative Party, Erin O’Toole says

O’Toole condemned the Capitol attack as ‘horrifying’ and sought to distance himself and the Tories from Trumpism

Most Read